Fashion Designers – Designs By Janie http://designsbyjanie.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:35:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://designsbyjanie.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Fashion Designers – Designs By Janie http://designsbyjanie.com/ 32 32 Fashion Law, Brand Partnerships, and Protecting Your Work From Copycats https://designsbyjanie.com/fashion-law-brand-partnerships-and-protecting-your-work-from-copycats/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:35:30 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/fashion-law-brand-partnerships-and-protecting-your-work-from-copycats/ The internet age has exacerbated many of the legal issues faced by fashion designers and businesses, fueling the need for specific legal protection and advice. For example, design piracy and imitation disputes have increased in recent years, leading to new legislation that provides legal protection for fashion designs. We decided to contact a lawyer to […]]]>

The internet age has exacerbated many of the legal issues faced by fashion designers and businesses, fueling the need for specific legal protection and advice.

For example, design piracy and imitation disputes have increased in recent years, leading to new legislation that provides legal protection for fashion designs.

We decided to contact a lawyer to shed light on these issues and others faced by actors in the creators’ economy.

Ashley N. Cloud, Esq., MBA is the founder and principal attorney of The Cloud Law Firm, PLLC based in Brooklyn, New York.

Ashley N. Cloud, Esq., MBA

What prompted you to become a lawyer?

My mother was the first person to suggest that I become a lawyer. My mom was super strict, so I always refrained from hanging out with my friends on weekends for more than 2 hours at a time. We would have full debates and I would write his letters with carefully crafted arguments. I was relentless.

Even though I was very convincing, most of the time my mother’s answer was always “no”, but she thought that I would be able to help others with my talents. Once my mother gave me the idea of ​​being a lawyer, it made sense. I’ve never been one to accept the status quo. I have always been quick to point out wrongs and wrongs and never hesitate to help those in need.

Black women make up just 2% of the legal profession. The road was not easy, but it was more than worth it. Representation is important and I know that the work I do has a huge impact on my community. It brings me so much joy to be a voice for the voiceless and to empower and educate people like me.

I am so grateful and honored to do this work. I have so many ideas for how I can continue to be a positive force in this world and I’m just getting started!

What should creators include in brand partnership agreements?

Usually, creators receive brand partnership agreements, so there are a few clauses they should always look for. They include, but are not limited to, compensation, deliverables, exclusivity, termination, and disclosures.

Compensation is important for obvious reasons – you want to make sure you know what you’ll be paid, any terms associated with the payment, and when you should expect your payment. When it comes to deliverables, you want to make sure you understand what the brand expects of you and that what you create meets their requirements. There will likely be an approval process that you’ll want to make sure you’re compliant with as well.

Often, brands will ask you to work with them exclusively for their respective industry. For example, if you work with a shoe company, you may not be able to work with other shoe companies for the duration of your contract. Pay attention to the duration of the agreement and under what conditions you or the brand can terminate the agreement; including any morality clauses.

If you’re a content creator, you’ll also need to pay attention to any disclosure requirements, as the Federal Trade Commission requires you to disclose your relationship with the brands you promote. You can check out helpful tips on FTC guidelines here.

Kim Kardashian was recently ordered to pay over $1 million for breaking FTC rules, so you’re going to want to pay attention!

Either way, you’ll want to read your contract, ask questions if you don’t understand something, and don’t forget to know your worth! Stand up for what you want if you’re not happy with the terms of your deal.

If you’re unsure if partnership is right for you, or if you still don’t understand the implications of the terms of your agreement, I suggest you contact an attorney you trust to help you.

What are the common misconceptions in fashion law?

One of the biggest misconceptions about fashion law is that it’s about intellectual property. Of course, intellectual property is an exciting facet of fashion law, but there is more to fashion law than just intellectual property.

Fashion is a multi-billion dollar industry. It may be glamorous, but like any other industry, fashion is a Company. Besides intellectual property, fashion law includes business law, contract law, labor and employment law, real estate law, international law, e-commerce law, life law law, supply chain law, technology law, consumer protection law, environmental law and so much more! The law really touches every aspect of a fashion business.

As the creator economy grows, what kinds of legal issues do you foresee?

There are more creators entering the market now that the barrier to entry is lower and consumers are more accessible. The main legal issue that I see growing in popularity is the world of non-fungible tokens (NFTs), blockchain, and the metaverse.

Because the law hasn’t quite caught up to this facet of fintech and intellectual property, I’m interested to see what kinds of precedents are being set to help guide creators and lawyers further in this space.

What recent fashion lawsuits interest you? What can designers learn from?

Recently, Skechers USA Inc. filed a lawsuit against Hermès International and Hermès of Paris, Inc. for patent infringement regarding its Massage Fit insole technology. This case got me excited because it is the perfect example of properly monitoring and enforcing your intellectual property rights.

Skechers sued brands for a similar infringement. With the popularity of the chunky, chunky shoe sole emerging in recent years, it will be up to the courts to decide whether Hermès infringed Skechers’ patents or whether the company was simply jumping on a popular trend not created by Skechers.

fashion law
CREDIT: UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK

Another case that stands out and is not related to fashion but is more in the realm of entertainment, is the lawsuit recently filed by Goldenvoice, the company responsible for the popular American music festival Coachella, against Afrochella, a popular music festival Ghanaian. Afrochella allegedly infringed Coachella’s trademark and goodwill in promoting Afrochella.

There are arguments on both sides about whether Afrochella should be held liable for Coachella trademark infringement. One argument is that Afrochella specifically identified its own festival as inspired by Coachella, which some say creates an unauthorized affiliation between the brands.

Another argument is that Afrochella only takes place in Ghana and should be allowed to use its name since the company does not currently host its festival in the United States. I’m interested to see how the courts will decide this case or if the brands can come to an amicable settlement.

How can small designers protect their work from copying?

Formal intellectual property protections of fashion designs (i.e. the shape, style or fit of a garment) are virtually unprotected. However, there are several ways to protect certain aspects of your work as a fashion designer. In particular, you can protect an original print, design or sculptural adornment that is included on a garment through copyright protection. You can also protect certain types of creations with a design or utility patent.

Additionally, you need to protect your Mark through trademark and trade dress protection. Another way to protect your designs is to draft and sign contracts in partnership with others. For example, you can require the maker of your designs to sign a non-disclosure and non-compete agreement so that they don’t leak your design to another brand or try to replicate your design by creating their own. counterfeit. If so, you may be able to recover damages for breach of your contract and sales associated with that breach.

I also suggest designers use the power of their communities to fill the gaps in the law. When you see another designer or brand copying your design, let them know via social media. It’s much cheaper and you may be able to resolve the dispute much faster than by taking legal action.

Ashley is originally from Houston, Texas and is a proud graduate of Howard University School of Law and School of Commerce. Ashley is licensed to practice law in New York, Texas and the District of Columbia. Follow @thecloudlawfirm and @yourfashionattorney for updates. You can also visit www.thecloudlawfirm.com for more information.

Disclaimer: The information provided on this website does not constitute and is not intended to constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content and materials available on this site are for general informational purposes only. The information on this website may not constitute the most up-to-date legal or other information. This website contains links to other third party websites. These links are solely for the convenience of the reader, user or browser; Ashley N. Cloud and The Cloud Law Firm PLLC do not recommend or endorse the content of third-party sites.
Readers of this website should contact their attorney for advice on any particular legal matter. No reader, user, or browser of this site should act or refrain from acting upon any information on this site without first seeking the advice of an attorney of competent jurisdiction. Only your individual attorney can guarantee that the information contained herein – and your interpretation of it – is applicable or appropriate to your particular situation. Use of and access to this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site does not create an attorney-client relationship between the reader, user or browser and the authors of the website, the contributors, contributing law firms or committee members and their respective employers.
Any responsibility for actions taken or not taken on the basis of the content of this site is expressly disclaimed. The contents of this publication are provided “as is”; no representation is made that the content is error-free.

]]>
Emily Davies is heartbroken after claiming Valleygirl was ‘duped’ by her design https://designsbyjanie.com/emily-davies-is-heartbroken-after-claiming-valleygirl-was-duped-by-her-design/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:41:36 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/emily-davies-is-heartbroken-after-claiming-valleygirl-was-duped-by-her-design/ An Australian small business owner has alleged that her work was copied by another store. Emily Davies is the woman behind Venem 1.0, an online fashion retailer, and took to social media to claim that Valleygirl imitated one of her ‘exclusive’ designs which included her brand name in the print on the dress, according to […]]]>

An Australian small business owner has alleged that her work was copied by another store.

Emily Davies is the woman behind Venem 1.0, an online fashion retailer, and took to social media to claim that Valleygirl imitated one of her ‘exclusive’ designs which included her brand name in the print on the dress, according to The Daily Telegraph.

The Venem 1.0 dress typically retails from $149 but is currently on sale for a third of the price.

“It’s my dress – I designed it. I designed the print. It took us 12 months to develop because it was the first print we’ve ever done,” Ms Davies said.

Deliver the news you want, when you want with Flash. More than 25 news channels in one place. New to Flash? Try 1 month free. Offer available for a limited time only >

She then compared it to a recent version of Valleygirl, showing a similar print as well as a chain connecting the bust.

“It’s now stocked in all their stores in Australia and it’s heartbreaking,” she said.

“And the worst part is that I can’t do anything about it because I haven’t trademarked or copyrighted the design or the print.”

She also said that Valleygirl’s dress even included her trademark “Venem” in the print.

“As my brand name is in your stores, you could have at least removed my brand name.”

She said she understands that everyone gets inspiration from somewhere, adding that she gets inspiration from other brands, runways and Pinterest.

But she said “inspo” was the key word.

“We’re also a small business and we don’t have the money to do anything in terms of going to court – and that sucks,” she said.

Ms Davies said she understood both labels were fast fashion. But she said that was taken to a new level with the use of her trademark Venem 1.0 in the mix.

She also acknowledged that it was the “nature of the game” and said its makers had not reprinted it.

The Valleygirl online store has been “temporarily closed until further notice”.

She initially alleged the “dupe” came from Ally Fashion, but retracted those claims after doing further research.

“I want to sincerely apologize to Ally Fashion. I was misinformed by multiple followers that it was Ally Fashion and it wasn’t – it was Valleygirl,” she said.

“It’s my fault, I should have done my research, but in the heat of the moment I was so upset and learned from it.”

News.com.au has contacted Valleygirl for comment.

]]>
Fashion designer Tom Ford is gearing up for a lucrative exit https://designsbyjanie.com/fashion-designer-tom-ford-is-gearing-up-for-a-lucrative-exit/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:21:05 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/fashion-designer-tom-ford-is-gearing-up-for-a-lucrative-exit/ In 2016 Tom Ford told the Financial Times he was “determined” to turn his eponymous beauty, eyewear and fashion business into a $3 billion business by 2025. It didn’t quite make the mark, but it came close. On Tuesday, Estée Lauder Companies announced that it has acquired the Tom Ford brand in a deal that […]]]>

In 2016 Tom Ford told the Financial Times he was “determined” to turn his eponymous beauty, eyewear and fashion business into a $3 billion business by 2025.

It didn’t quite make the mark, but it came close. On Tuesday, Estée Lauder Companies announced that it has acquired the Tom Ford brand in a deal that values ​​it at $2.8 billion. The sale is set to make a 61-year-old Ford billionaire, who made a name for himself by turning near-bankrupt Gucci into a fashion powerhouse before launching his eponymous company in 2005.

It could also signal Ford’s exit from fashion. Zegna has agreed to expand its license for Tom Ford menswear to include womenswear, childrenswear and accessories, while Marcolin has “significantly expanded” its license for Tom Ford eyewear, said declared ELC. But Ford and Chairman Domenico De Sole only agreed to stay on until the end of next year.

“He wasn’t willing to get involved any longer than [the end of 2023]“says a source close to the negotiations. “He is no longer interested in fashion.”

Friends and former colleagues say Ford’s interests have long since shifted to Hollywood, where he directed two critically acclaimed films, A single man (2009) and nocturnal animals (2016). Based in Los Angeles since 2017, he stepped down as president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America in May. “There is not much grace in [fashion] more,” he told the FT in 2016. “It seems to have escalated to a point where there’s not a lot of respect for the designer. And it’s really sad.

“I feel like he’s ‘finished’ fashion. What else could he have to prove? says Whitney Bromberg Hawkings, who worked with him for 20 years. “It’s the sexy exit. He doesn’t cling. »

Ford’s stardom has long since transcended the island world of fashion. His impeccable grooming, daily routine and the uniform consisting of a white shirt, dark tie, gold pin and peak lapel suit are mesmerizing. Former employees describe him as “incredibly demanding”, “anal about everything”, “silly”, “funny”, “incredibly witty”, “kind” and “the hardest working human being in the world “. He engenders fierce loyalty, many of his associates have worked for him for decades.

“Tom’s huge success is because he was as fabulous and movie star-worthy as anything he ever designed,” Anna Wintour wrote in an email. “His own personal brand has always been as alluring as the houses he has worked for – although behind all the glamor is an incredibly hard-working man with a wicked sense of humor who is the most loyal and most loyal friend. kindly.”

“He’s motivated,” says Steven Kolb, who worked with him at the CFDA. “You can’t be Tom Ford and sell a company for $2.3 billion. [in upfront payments] if you are unsure of what you want in life.

Ford was born in Austin, Texas in 1961, the son of two real estate brokers. His interest in fashion was apparent at an early age: his peers teased him for showing up to school in a blazer, loafers and a briefcase. Ford moved to New York in 1979 to study art history at New York University, dropping out after a year to continue acting in Los Angeles. He returned to enroll in an interior design course but soon turned to fashion, working at sportswear brand Cathy Hardwick and then Perry Ellis under Marc Jacobs. In 1990 he decamped to Milan to design womenswear at Gucci and four years later was promoted to creative director.

His Fall/Winter 1995 collection heralded a glamorous new direction for a stuffy leather goods house mired in financial turmoil. Ford’s status as fashion’s “it” designer was cemented when Madonna appeared at the MTV Video Music Awards in one of the collection’s main looks.

By 2004, Gucci had become The Gucci Group and Ford presided over a $10 billion portfolio that included Yves Saint Laurent, Bottega Veneta and Stella McCartney. But contract negotiations with the group’s new owners, the Pinault family, soured and Ford left that year. The day he found out he and Gucci were going their separate ways, he took Hawkings to see ‘Love Actually’ in Leicester Square at lunchtime where ‘we cried our brains out’, she recalled.

“I had no voice in contemporary culture”, Ford reminded of this time. “I had such a powerful voice in the 90s and an identity that I worked really hard for. And all of a sudden I didn’t have that anymore, and I didn’t really know what I was going to do. .

He rents an office in Chelsea, where he plans a high-end beauty business that he launches with Estée Lauder to much fanfare in 2006. Their first fragrance, Black Orchid, becomes a best-seller; more followed, along with lipstick, priced at a then-impactful $48, and a full line of makeup.

“It’s phenomenally well done,” says Lana Todorovich, president of luxury retailer Neiman Marcus. “It brought an idea of ​​glamor [that was missing in beauty].” Licensing for eyewear and menswear followed, and in September 2010 Ford returned to the runway to launch its first womenswear collection.

By the end of the decade, the Tom Ford label was aiming for annual sales of $1 billion. But the pandemic has taken its toll, forcing the company to lay off and lay off staff. ELC said it expects the brand to hit the $1 billion mark in net sales “over the next two years.”

The pandemic has also been difficult for Ford personally. Richard Buckley, her husband and partner of 35 years, died after a long illness in September 2021, aged 72. Together they had a son, Jack, via surrogate 10 years ago.

“The world knows that Tom is a perfectionist, that he has impeccable style, that he is a designer,” says Diane von Furstenberg. “He’s the Marlboro man of fashion. He’s also, on top of that, an extraordinarily kind human being.

lauren.indvik@ft.com

]]>
Kate Middleton marks Catherine Walker’s Remembrance Sunday service – WWD https://designsbyjanie.com/kate-middleton-marks-catherine-walkers-remembrance-sunday-service-wwd/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 15:02:58 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/kate-middleton-marks-catherine-walkers-remembrance-sunday-service-wwd/ LONDON – English Royal family reunited for the first time this weekend since The death of Queen Elizabeth II September 8. King Charles led the Remembrance Sunday service for the first time as a monarch in the presence of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, along with other Members of Parliament and the Royal Household. During the […]]]>

LONDON – English Royal family reunited for the first time this weekend since The death of Queen Elizabeth II September 8.

King Charles led the Remembrance Sunday service for the first time as a monarch in the presence of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, along with other Members of Parliament and the Royal Household.

During the service, King Charles and Prince William laid wreaths at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, dressed in gray military uniforms with a matching double-breasted coat.

Catherine, Princess of Wales, and Camilla, queen consortwatched from the balcony in their head-to-toe black ensembles.

The princess wore a black brimmed hat with a thin structured coat by Catherine Walker with three poppies pinned above a diamond brooch.

Catherine Walker was part of Princess Diana’s circle of trusted fashion designers and they collaborated throughout her life.

Catherine, Princess of Wales wearing Catherine Walker in 2020.

Getty Images

Since Middleton’s new title as Princess of Walesshe firmly saluted her late mother-in-law with her clothing choices.

The Princess often wears British designs to the service. She previously carried Catherine Walker to the socially distanced Remembrance Day service in 2020.

Remembrance Sunday is considered one of the most important dates in the royal calendar, when senior officials of the Royal family gather to honor members of the armed forces who have died in the line of duty.

On Saturday evening, the Royal Household attended the annual Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

Middleton wore a new black crepe and pleated chiffon midi dress from Self-Portrait that resembled a white version she wore to the Platinum Jubilee Party last June.

She accessorized her look with the queen’s Japanese pearl choker, which consists of four strands connected by a diamond clasp.

The pearls were a gift from the Japanese government, and the queen had them made into a necklace. The Queen first wore the choker in the early 1980s, then lent it to Princess Diana in 1982 for a state visit to the Netherlands.

Middleton first wore the choker in 2017 at the Queen and Prince Philip’s 70th wedding anniversary dinner.

]]>
7-year-old fashion designer on the catwalk in December | Way of life https://designsbyjanie.com/7-year-old-fashion-designer-on-the-catwalk-in-december-way-of-life/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 05:06:22 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/7-year-old-fashion-designer-on-the-catwalk-in-december-way-of-life/ What do you want to be when you grow up? This is probably the most serious question ever asked of a child. And those answers can vary from a lawyer or a policeman to a doctor, a soldier or a firefighter. These days we have seen an evolution in career options. But a girl doesn’t […]]]>

What do you want to be when you grow up? This is probably the most serious question ever asked of a child. And those answers can vary from a lawyer or a policeman to a doctor, a soldier or a firefighter. These days we have seen an evolution in career options. But a girl doesn’t just share her youthful ambitions; she puts her dream into action.

Seven-year-old Logan Watkins is one of the children’s designers in this year’s Island Child Style show. The young designer, who also rocks the runway as a model, works diligently behind the scenes to bring her designs to life and thoroughly enjoys the process. “What I enjoyed the most was designing my own clothes and seeing them in person, because I love seeing what I do in real life,” Logan said. Living.

She recently launched a piece from her line called Logan’s Unicorn Collection on the catwalk at the launch of Island Child Style, to the amazement of the public. Inspired by her own imagination, she opted for an underwater mermaid theme, sporting bright colors and sparkling sequins. His role model, Haley Matalon, brought the right amount of splashes to the runway, one that was “river” to leave viewers wanting more. The duo then emerged onto the stage for the Creators Walk, where they were greeted by a sea of ​​love from onlookers.

When asked how the showcase went, Logan revealed that it was a great experience. “My favorite part was meeting my own works in person. Every time I see that, I feel like I’m getting more creative,” she shared. “What I think has helped me as a designer is the way I work with art, like the details and the colors I have to use, as my imagination tells me what to draw. .”

She also enjoyed modeling in the fashion show, adding, “Every time I practice, I feel like I can improve and be more confident.” Her parade adventure naturally played an important role in her outlook on clothing as a designer.

Beaming with pride at her side was her mother, Kimberlee, who continues to be impressed with her daughter’s remarkable talents. “The piece that was shown today is just a preview. There will be a lot more details about it,” she said.

Logan has always loved art, his mother said. “Ever since she could pick up a pencil, she’s been into art. She used to mix her mediums all the time, wanting to paint and create with pencils, markers and glitter to achieve different textures,” said she recounted.

But what created a shift towards design was the demand for doll clothes. “She really wanted to buy all these clothes for her dolls. And I was like, ‘You can’t buy stuff like that and buy stuff all the time.’ That’s when she said, ‘I have a great idea. What if I learned to make my own clothes for my dolls? Kimberlee revealed. This ingenious style move quickly transcended Logan into creating clothes for herself so mom didn’t have to buy too much for her. “She said to me, ‘If I can figure out how to make clothes for my dolls, then eventually I’ll learn how to make my own clothes, then you won’t have to buy me clothes and I can get this. I want,'” the proud mom added with a laugh.

The journey started with a toy sewing machine and different pieces of fabric. Kimberlee bought her daughter a designer sketchbook for girls, in 2020, and Logan went to town, sparking creativity on paper. “I noticed that she started using stickers and putting on different jewelry; the shoes were different. Then she started drawing freehand,” Kimberlee added.

After meeting local style specialist Norma Williams, whom Logan calls Aunt Norma, during a photo shoot with her father, photographer Dwayne Watkins, Logan asked for help on set. This initiative put her on the path to a goal. “Out of the blue she came over and showed me this amazing design with a princess cape and rosettes on the shoulders. She described her design and Aunt Norma hired her, asking her what she would think about designing things,” Kimberlee said.

The young designer started with five models. She was so dedicated to the cause that she woke up as early as 5 a.m. to make design part of her to-do list for the day. “I am overwhelmed. It’s more than just a fashion show. It’s a discipline she instilled in herself. She woke up on her own. I tried to help him with one of his drawings, [but] she erased my drawing and wanted to do something else. She is very precise on the location of the seams, the fabric to be used [and] which colors should be used where. I can’t wait for everyone to see his final piece.

Logan has completed a total of 15 creations, all by himself, which will be exhibited at Island Child Style on December 3.

krysta.anderson@gleanerjm.com

]]>
Lenny Kravitz receives the Fashion Icon Award from the Council of Fashion Designers of America – Everett Post https://designsbyjanie.com/lenny-kravitz-receives-the-fashion-icon-award-from-the-council-of-fashion-designers-of-america-everett-post/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:50:14 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/lenny-kravitz-receives-the-fashion-icon-award-from-the-council-of-fashion-designers-of-america-everett-post/ Newly inducted Lionel Richie at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Lenny Kravitz took the stage Monday night in New York to accept his own honor. bradley cooper introduced Kravitz to the Fashion Icon Award at the CDFA Fashion Awards, organized by the Council of Fashion Designers of America. According USA today, Kravitz said […]]]>

Newly inducted Lionel Richie at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Lenny Kravitz took the stage Monday night in New York to accept his own honor. bradley cooper introduced Kravitz to the Fashion Icon Award at the CDFA Fashion Awards, organized by the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

According USA today, Kravitz said at the event, “What I learned along the way is that being yourself is the most important thing you can do. And that you will make mistakes. I’ve certainly had my share of fashion failures, but that’s part of evolution.

As this year’s fashion icon, Kravitz of course made a bold statement with his outfit for the event: he wore a custom look by The Quan Smith consisting of leather pants, a cut-out suit jacket and a black ostrich feather boa.

lenny Told vogue“I reached out to LaQuan after admiring her work for a while and we met in person just a few days ago to vibe. We had instant chemistry and creativity right away. I love her vision… to be the first to wear designs he made for men is an honor.

Smith, meanwhile, said: “Lenny is an icon and has always been a major inspiration to me, both in my work and in my personal style…I wanted to push the boundaries of menswear with this look and j feel like this is the start of something bigger. It feels like a very iconic moment.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

]]>
King visits African fashion exhibition in ‘symbolic’ visit https://designsbyjanie.com/king-visits-african-fashion-exhibition-in-symbolic-visit/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 22:00:24 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/king-visits-african-fashion-exhibition-in-symbolic-visit/ The king and queen consort’s visit to a major exhibition showcasing African fashion talent has been described as a “symbolic moment” by a leading male designer. Fashion designer Ozwald Boateng met the royal couple after their guided tour of the exhibition and welcomed their decision to visit the attraction was staged at the V&A museum […]]]>
The king and queen consort’s visit to a major exhibition showcasing African fashion talent has been described as a “symbolic moment” by a leading male designer. Fashion designer Ozwald Boateng met the royal couple after their guided tour of the exhibition and welcomed their decision to visit the attraction was staged at the V&A museum in London and appeared to joke with Charles about making him a costume.

The King revealed he had sent a private donation following the devastating floods in Nigeria, when he chatted with the founder of Lagos Fashion Week during the visit he had requested, ahead of the visit of State of South African President Cyril Ramaphosa later this month.

Edward Enninful, editor of British Vogue, joined his industry colleague when he met the King and his wife and said of the exhibit: “To me, it’s amazing for the world of to see what Africa has brought to the world in terms of design, culture so the timing is perfect, I’m so thrilled.

Boateng added: “As a starting position I think it’s a good start and I hope to see a lot more and for King Charles to come and visit and show that level of interest is very very symbolic.”

The King and Queen consort during their visit to the Africa Fashion exhibition (Ian Vogler/Daily Mirror/PA)

The menswear designer was inspired to succeed in fashion after receiving a grant from the Prince’s Trust which he used to buy a sewing machine and is known today for his suits which have a unique twist on classic British tailoring .

At one point during his conversation with the King, Charles looked down at his clothes touching them as he appeared to be joking with Boateng about the designer making him a suit.

The menswear designer then said, “I’m sure at some point I’ll make him a really nice custom suit, I’m sure.”

African Fashion Fair
The King and Queen consort (Ian Vogler/Daily Mirror/PA)

More than 600 people were killed in floods in Nigeria and Omoyemi Akerele, founder of Lagos Fashion Week who met the King during his previous visit to Nigeria, said: “The flood situation in Nigeria is so appalling .

“He should be front and center everywhere, and he really isn’t.

“He was like, ‘This is really terrible, I had to send a donation too.

“We all need to help in any way we can.”

As the King and Queen browsed the fashion exhibition, which focuses on crafts and textiles, Akerele said Charles was particularly interested in the work of artisan designers.

She said: “He’s super invested in artisans and the role they play in the economy.

“It’s also dear to our hearts, so it’s something, dare I say, we have in common.”

]]>
SIFF and the Jewish Community Present the Sedona Jewish Film Festival November 5-7 https://designsbyjanie.com/siff-and-the-jewish-community-present-the-sedona-jewish-film-festival-november-5-7/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 20:39:33 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/siff-and-the-jewish-community-present-the-sedona-jewish-film-festival-november-5-7/ The Sedona International Film Festival is proud to partner with the Jewish community of Sedona and the Verde Valley to present the Sedona Jewish Film Festival November 5-7 at the Mary D. Fisher Theater. The program will feature five award-winning feature films from around the world. iMordecai – Opening Night Film Saturday, Nov. 5, at […]]]>

The Sedona International Film Festival is proud to partner with the Jewish community of Sedona and the Verde Valley to present the Sedona Jewish Film Festival November 5-7 at the Mary D. Fisher Theater. The program will feature five award-winning feature films from around the world.

iMordecai – Opening Night Film

Saturday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m.

Opening night kicks off with a heartwarming comedy based on a true story – “iMordecai” – featuring Oscar-nominated actor and two-time Emmy winner Judd Hirsch (star of the sitcom “Taxi”, “Ordinary People ,” “Independence Day”), alongside Oscar nominee Carol Kane (“Hester Street”) and Oscar nominee Sean Astin (“Lord of the Rings”).

Marvin is an ambitious cigar maker trying to support his own family while still being there for his aging parents, Mordecai and Fela. When Mordecai’s old flip phone breaks down, he begins taking lessons on his new iPhone, opening it up to all kinds of new experiences and adventures, which makes him feel like a kid again. .

“iMordecai” is an uplifting comedy that urges us all to fully live the life we ​​have.

WET DOG

Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4 p.m.

Solheil was 15 when his Jewish-Iranian family moved to Wedding, one of Berlin’s multicultural, predominantly Muslim neighborhoods. As the other kids listen to hip hop music, and the Wedding Tigers gang dominates the town with their graffiti and starts fights with other local crews, eager to fit in, Soheil hides his true origins. At night, he becomes the King Star writer, covering the city with colorful tags and murals; during the day he flirts with Selma – one of the cool girls.

Until the day when Soheil’s gang of friends decide to rob the local “Jewry”, as they call it, run by none other than Soheil’s parents. This is when Soheil must embrace who he is and where he comes from, with regular visits to the local library to learn more about Judaism.

Based on a provocative autobiography written twenty years ago, “Wet Dog” raises questions of cultural diversity, religious identity and their intersection with friendship, especially during the phase of brutality and exploration that is adolescence.

BERENSHTEIN

Sunday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m.

The last surviving member of the Great Followers who located Hitler’s secret weapon, the V2 Missile Development Facility, revisits his past as a soldier in World War II. Diving into his traumatic memories, he is forced to deal with the dissociation and loss of identity that followed the war. Despite this adversity, it becomes clear that he is able to stay true to his values ​​through it all. Based on the true story of Leonid Berenshtein.

THE WAVING HUNGARIAN

Monday, November 7 at 4 p.m.

Director Tom Weidlinger traces the footsteps of his famous father Paul Weidlinger around the world, from his early childhood in Budapest to the founding of an internationally renowned structural engineering company in the United States. Paul Weidlinger has collaborated with some of the world’s most celebrated architects and artists to create brilliant, innovative buildings influenced by Bauhaus and modernist design and based on his own dance-inspired “joy of space” philosophy. .

Told through hand-drawn sketches, archival footage, photographs, letters, paintings, songs and dramatic re-enactments, this documentary paints a vivid portrait of the challenges Paul Weidlinger overcame as a refugee who fled Europe for Bolivia and eventually the United States during the Holocaust. While celebrating his accomplishments and legacy, Weidlinger tackles his father’s involvement in building Cold War missile silos as well as his family’s history of mental illness, particularly the stories tragedies of his mother, his sister and his nephew. Few people know that Paul Weidlinger founded his own engineering company to pay for the cost of the mental institution where his first wife had been committed.

With readings from his memoirs, The Restless Hungarian: Modernism, Madness, and the American Dream, Tom Weidlinger powerfully uncovers his father’s secrets.

This special screening of “The Restless Hungarian” will be followed by a Zoom Q&A with director Tom Weidlinger, hosted by Rabbi Alicia Magal.

THE UNITED STATES OF ELIE TAHARI

Monday, November 7 at 7 p.m.

Fashion designer and mogul Elie Tahari has been living the American dream for over 50 years. He came to New York in 1971 from Israel with less than $100, slept on benches in Central Park, and went on to build a billion-dollar fashion empire. There are thousands of fashion companies in the world, but only three have lasted more than 45 years in the world and are still led by their founders: Giorgio Armani, Ralph Lauren and Elie Tahari.

“The United States of Elie Tahari” is the first documentary ever made on Elie Tahari. Filmed in 2020, this highly anticipated documentary chronicles Elie Tahari’s life from birth and origins (born in Israel to Iranian parents) through all of his accomplishments and legacy. Part of the documentary is also dedicated to Tahari’s creative process and his endurance in the fashion world.

Several fashion personalities such as Fern Mallis (aka The Godmother of Fashion), Melissa Rivers, fashion designers Nicole Miller and Dennis Basso, Arthur S. Levine, Wallstreet Journal fashion journalist Teri Agins, as well as music Disco, the models, Studio 54 and more, are part of the film.

The Sedona Jewish Film Festival is presented by the Sedona & Verde Valley Jewish Community Cultural Committee and the Sedona International Film Festival.

Tickets for each show are $12 general admission or $9 for Film Festival members. For tickets and more information, please call 928-282-1177. The theater and film festival office is located at 2030 W. Hwy. 89A, in West Sedona. For more information and to order tickets online, visit SedonaFilmFestival.org.

Information provided by SIFF.

]]>
How I Became… Vice President of Product Design at Allbirds https://designsbyjanie.com/how-i-became-vice-president-of-product-design-at-allbirds/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 10:36:52 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/how-i-became-vice-president-of-product-design-at-allbirds/ Allbirds Vice President of Product Design Ashley Comeaux studied industrial product design in Detroit at the College for Creative Studies before landing internships at Reebok, Converse and 4sight Inc. Her first full-time position was at Nike as a shoe designer, where she rose through the ranks to director of shoe design during her 10 years […]]]>

Allbirds Vice President of Product Design Ashley Comeaux studied industrial product design in Detroit at the College for Creative Studies before landing internships at Reebok, Converse and 4sight Inc. Her first full-time position was at Nike as a shoe designer, where she rose through the ranks to director of shoe design during her 10 years with the company.

“Tenacity goes a long way. Do what you want, believe in yourself and defend yourself [has] helped me along my journey,” she said in a LinkedIn Live broadcast last week. “Being my own cheerleader and sharing what I have to offer and how I can add value to every opportunity I have.”

In 2021, Comeaux joined Allbirds, the certified B Corp footwear and apparel brand, as senior director of footwear design and lifestyle. Today, she is vice president of product design for the company.

Now, BoF Careers shares insights and actionable tips from last week’s event, Building a career in fashion with Ashley Comeaux.

What inspired you to pursue a career in fashion, specifically product design?

THAT : My affinity for art and creativity was ultimately the catalyst for entering the fashion space and connecting that passion with my innate ability to solve problems – and my desire to make things better led me into the product design.

Shoes came into my life very early in my high school career, and [I wanted] using shoes as a vehicle for problem solving, while also wrapping them up expressively and aesthetically.

Do you think formal training is necessary to work in product design?

THAT : I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan. A lot has changed over the last decade, with platforms like YouTube or TikTok, [as well as] learning platforms like Skillshare, lowering the barrier to entry for education in a highly technical space like product design.

So while there is great value in formal training, versus honing your craft in a competitive environment with other hungry people, I think times have moved on. [and] you don’t necessarily have to go that route. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of education, but I think there’s a more diverse way to get educated in a field like product design today.

What advice would you give to someone starting out in the industry?

THAT : The job itself is a big talk, so make sure you’re really honing your skills. Then, once the door is crossed, it is [about] be able to articulate what makes your work unique.

Tenacity [also] go far. Do what you want, believe in yourself and defend yourself [has] helped me throughout my journey. Be my own cheerleader and share what I have to offer and how I can bring value to every opportunity I have.

[…] If you come from a different industry, understand what skill sets you have that are transferable. There are different things you can learn in a different industry that can translate into design – maybe you have graphic design skills that allow you to create beautiful compositions, [or how] you present some ideas. […] It’s about taking what you know and presenting your point of view in a different way.

What role or relevance do internships have today for future designers?

THAT : Internships are great for finding out if you want to stay in that industry or that path. This is great for understanding how a business works or how a particular discipline works within a process in a given business, [and] it’s a wonderful way to meet people and learn from different experiences. So there are a lot of pros [in] internships.

The job itself is a big talk, so make sure you’re really honing your skills.

However, the landscape is different today – I’ve seen individuals land jobs outside of social media, so I think it’s more about finding all the ways to hone your skills and gain experience, whether formal or informal.

What skills have you developed during your tenure at Nike that have helped advance your career?

THAT : I like to break it down into people, products and processes.

Compared to people, the fashion industry is quite small and [so it’s important] to manage your reputation and precede it in a positive way. Your peers today may be your bosses tomorrow, so take care of your work, how you connect with others, and make sure you create a good group of advocates for you on your journey.

When it comes to the product, it’s important to have a unique vision and perspective to really exert influence. Conception is an 18-24 month process and along the way many factors come into play that can dilute your vision. Your ability to influence, to bring people [on board with] this vision and to see it until reality intact is a beautiful art and a beautiful science.

Finally, regarding the process, as a designer you are a very important part of the process – but you are also only part of [it]. It’s important to consider other features that help bring your vision to life.

How are you and your team members improving your skills?

THAT : By remaining a student. I’m VP now and I still design alongside my team. This allows me to stay close to the product design and creation processes. I learn as much from my team as I hope they learn from me. It’s about taking notes and absorbing different people’s processes to get an answer, seek new inspiration, and stay curious.

How would you suggest aspiring designers incorporate sustainability into their process?

THAT : Getting out of your primary design goal is key to understanding the whole process involved in getting your creation to market. It’s easy to stay in your lane, but understanding the downstream effects of the decisions you make can impact how you approach design.

Diligence around the choice of materials and their assembly, diligence [over methods of] getting your designs delivered – ocean shipping versus air freight – getting to the heart of the matter can help make you a stronger, environmental designer.

What are the soft skills required in the work of a product designer?

THAT : to be able to glean [consumer and market] knowledge. Asking the right questions is key to uncovering this information. On my team, we come together around market research and understanding what’s going on – not just around us, but in the world, to understand why a product needs to exist in the first place.

Have the ability to translate a brief into a design. A brief brings together the request of a designer who understands what technology is [available]what problem you are solving, what is the market landscape, what is the inspiration you want to drive through the product, and the basic understanding of materials – how materials take on color, the function of those materials, and how they support the design you have in mind.

Your peers today may be your bosses tomorrow, so take care of your work, how you connect with others.

Amid this, navigating relationships with functions such as product development and marketing, ensuring everyone is working together to [deliver the best product]. As a young designer coming out of school, you tend to have a strong connection to your work, taking it personally if criticized.

Once you enter a business [role], the work you do is to serve a customer who may not be you. This is a very important skill to learn, develop and know early in your career. Take [your] battles.

What makes a candidate stand out today?

THAT : A candidate who can articulate their design process and who brings a unique point of view to the table, who has interesting points of reference and the ability to express their creative design solutions while integrating them with the company’s design ethic. ‘A brand. It’s one thing to have a signature as a designer, but the ability to take that signature and marry it with a design philosophy is a unique skill set.

And then a candidate who has a team spirit, who is hungry and thirsty to learn, who is coachable and curious. I appreciate a highly collaborative candidate who understands the value of bouncing ideas from their team, thereby truly strengthening their team.

If you’re reaching out to someone, make it clear what you want from the interaction. If you are looking for time, ask [no more than] 15 minutes – anyone can donate 15 minutes – and have pointed questions about what you are looking to learn in that time.

[Taking the initiative] requires courage and self-confidence. The design world can be very competitive and therefore [your] unique point of view and [how] you present it is important. [Consider] what story you have to tell and how you can bring value to a particular company.

Discover available pattern roles on BoF Careers:

Leather Goods and Accessories Designer (Internship), JW Anderson – London, United Kingdom

Senior Product Developer, Tommy Hilfiger – Amsterdam, Netherlands

Senior Director of Accessory Design, Calvin Klein — New York, United States

Assistant Product Development Manager, Chico’s —Fort Myers, USA

Tailoring Technician, Aje – Sydney, Australia

]]>
Jeri Ospital, the hip matriarch of SF’s Modern Appealing Clothing, dies at 94 https://designsbyjanie.com/jeri-ospital-the-hip-matriarch-of-sfs-modern-appealing-clothing-dies-at-94/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 11:01:03 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/jeri-ospital-the-hip-matriarch-of-sfs-modern-appealing-clothing-dies-at-94/ Chris Ospital, Ben Ospital and their mother, Jeri Ospital. Photo: Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle 2016 In 1983, Modern attractive clothes was a fledgling boutique on the edge of the Tenderloin known for up-and-coming designers such as Todd Oldham, Anna Sui and Marc Jacobs. Founded in 1980 by Jeri Ospital, her daughter Chris and son Ben, the […]]]>
Chris Ospital, Ben Ospital and their mother, Jeri Ospital. Photo: Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle 2016

In 1983, Modern attractive clothes was a fledgling boutique on the edge of the Tenderloin known for up-and-coming designers such as Todd Oldham, Anna Sui and Marc Jacobs. Founded in 1980 by Jeri Ospital, her daughter Chris and son Ben, the store also had a reputation as a social space where Bay Area creatives often met while browsing the shelves.

But with a mention of Herb Caen in its Chronique column, the shop enters a new stratosphere.

Madonna popped up one day, out of the blue, on her ‘Like a Virgin’ tour,” Ben Ospital recalls.

Caen’s chronicle of the visit put MAC on the map. In the four decades since, other high-profile clients have included alt-style icons such as singer-songwriter Amy Sedaris and her brother, writer David Sedaris, filmmaker John Watersactor Frances McDormandfilmmaker Joel Coen and art collectors Norah and Norman Stone.

Remembering that crucial first meeting with a celebrity in the life of the store in a 2016 Oral History Chronicle of the store, Jeri Ospital also recalled that the superstar “was really adorable as can be”.

Many agreed the same could be said of Jeri Ospital, who died at 94 of heart failure on October 5 in San Francisco. Together with her children, Ospital transformed the MAC, now located in Hayes Valley, into a unique fashion destination specializing in avant-garde clothing touted by The Chronicle, New York Times, Vogue and MTV. Her presence as a hip matriarch of MAC, smartly dressed and wearing her signature lipstick, helped establish a sense of family and community not usually associated with high-end fashion boutiques.

“She was our Aunt Mame,” Ben Ospital told The Chronicle weeks after his mother’s death, comparing her to author Patrick Dennis’ beloved character. “But she had no delusions of grandeur; she had illusions of pleasure. And she was so typically San Francisco. She was also interested in the life of a patron or a sex worker; she lent them an equal ear.

Modern Attractive Clothing: An Oral History of SF’s First Fashion Family

Ben Ospital, Jeri Ospital and Chris Ospital. Photo: Russell Yip/The Chronicle 2011

“That spirit is what we’ve always tried to do with the people in the store,” Chris Ospital, who noted that their mother was as likely to dine with experimental writer Kathy Acker as socialite Dodie Rosekrans, added to both friends and clients at the MAC, and that she had tea with punk rock fashion designer Vivienne Westwood. “We are then his children in this regard.

Award-winning food writer Peggy Knickerbocker, a longtime friend of the fashion family, said Jeri Ospital “always wanted to be where the action was, and she was always included by Chris and Ben in everything. It’s rare to see this kind of bond between mothers (adults) and children.It’s very old world.

In The Chronicle MAC oral historycultural critic Cintra Wilson called the Ospitals “San Francisco’s first fashion family”.

Jeri Ospital was born Geraldine Etcheverry on April 15, 1928 in Fullerton, Orange County, the second of four children born to Mary and Martin Etcheverry, both from Bayonne, France. She would retain a lifelong connection to her Basque heritage and had an early love of fashion, which her children attribute in part to a rebellion against the uniforms of her Catholic boarding school.

“When we were growing up, his style was much more I. Magnin“, Ben Ospital said. “Later she moved on to things like Nehru suits. On one level, she was bohemian, but she had everything tailored.

When Jeri Ospital was president of her PTA high school, Chris Ospital said it was common for classmates to see her Courrèges mod dresses and say, “Oh my god, your mom dresses so cool.”

Jeri Ospital earned a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the College of Saint Mary-of-the-Wasatch in Salt Lake City. After moving to San Francisco, she was introduced to Benjamin Ospital in April 1950 at a restaurant in North Beach. Benjamin Ospital was also Basque and had grown up in France after being born in San Francisco.

“Mom and dad were both kind of black sheep in their families,” Ben Ospital said. “They were deeply informed by this free-thinking culture of North Beach. Later, growing up in the suburbs, we realized our parents were basically Beatniks.

Jeri Ospital, co-founder of Modern Appealing Clothing in San Francisco, 1960s. Photo: Provided by the Ospital family

Jeri and Benjamin Ospital were married in December 1950. After Chris and Ben were born, the family moved in the early 1950s to Stockton, where Jeri and Benjamin opened the Ospital Villa Basque restaurant with Benjamin’s brothers, Jean and To fart. While their parents ran the restaurant, the siblings said they not only learned Basque cuisine, but also connected with local farmers and French winemakers in the area and learned to appreciate the culture. gatherings.

Anton Steubner, who worked as a sales associate at MAC from 2012 to 2017, said a love of connection through food has also informed the family’s ethos in the fashion industry.

“These are people who will stop a sale transaction to make a reservation at a restaurant you haven’t been to and recommend the gnocchi,” said Steubner, now gallery director Catherine Clark. “There is value for them in sharing community and special experiences with others, and that comes down to Jeri.”

Indeed, photographer Henny Garfunkel noted of the Ospitals that “there’s this offer of togetherness and friendship that comes when you walk into the store, and it comes back to my dear Jeri with that twinkle in her eye.”

Chris Ospital, Ben Ospital and their mother, Jeri Ospital. Photo: Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle

In 1978, the couple retired from the restaurant and moved back to San Francisco. When her husband died later that year, Jeri Ospital followed her children to New York and became manager of the famous Bird Cage restaurant at Lord & Taylor department store.

After Jeri Ospital returned to San Francisco in 1979, her children joined her.

In 1980, the three founded MAC near the Lower Nob Hill apartment where Jeri Ospital lived for 44 years. The store was originally filled with young designers Ospitals knew from New York and later gained a reputation for featuring Japanese and Belgian brands such as Like boysDries Van Noten and Walter Van Beirendonck.

“Make It” author and host Simon Doonan designed the store’s windows in the 1980s. oral history, Doonan described the dynamic between the Ospitals “like the Gabor sisters. They could tell a story between the three of them.

Jeri Ospital was in the store almost daily for over 30 years, only slowing down in the last decade. She was a longtime supporter of Creative growth and Creativity explored art centers for neurodiverse artists. In addition to art, she collected English and Chinese antiques and loved waking up in her Chinese marital bed with its view of the city.

Jeri Ospital was also a longtime volunteer with Project Open Hand and a regular presence at the Saturday Farmers’ Market at the San Francisco Ferry Building.

Chris and Ben Ospital called their mother a “committed left-wing democrat” and said she remains politically active. Although she did not participate in MAC’s 2017 lawsuit against Ivanka Trump alleging unfair advantage as a fashion retailer, Ben Ospital said her mother supported the suit.

Jeri Ospital summed up her retail philosophy in the oral history“Tell a person the truth. You give them three outfits and see what they like. If they go home and like the outfit, you have a client.

In addition to her two adult children, Jeri Ospital is survived by Ben’s husband, Nathaniel Anderson. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in their name for Compass Family Services C-Rent Fund. Funeral services will be private.



]]>