Fashion Designers – Designs By Janie http://designsbyjanie.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:35:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://designsbyjanie.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Fashion Designers – Designs By Janie http://designsbyjanie.com/ 32 32 Six fashion brands are pushing circular design beyond recycling https://designsbyjanie.com/six-fashion-brands-are-pushing-circular-design-beyond-recycling/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/six-fashion-brands-are-pushing-circular-design-beyond-recycling/ A new book from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation features pioneering fashion designers and brands who share their approach to designing for a circular economy. Here, editor-in-chief Elodie Rousselot selects six of the most innovative. the Circular design for fashion The book is part instruction manual, part manifesto and features practical insights from over 88 contributors […]]]>

A new book from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation features pioneering fashion designers and brands who share their approach to designing for a circular economy. Here, editor-in-chief Elodie Rousselot selects six of the most innovative.


the Circular design for fashion The book is part instruction manual, part manifesto and features practical insights from over 88 contributors ranging from luxury conglomerates to independent labels from London to Lagos.

Following on from the foundation’s more general guide to circular design, this latest publication focuses on the global fashion industry, which emits more greenhouse gases each year than France, Germany and the United Kingdom combined. Eighty-seven percent of the textiles used to make clothing end up incinerated or landfilled.

Nigerian label Orange Culture (top image) contributed to the book Circular Design for Fashion (above)

But over the past few years, many brands and designers in this space have started taking steps to remove waste and pollution from the lifecycle of their products.

“I think we are seeing a beautiful moment in the industry, where many are actively looking at how they can change their businesses and how they design products that fit the circular economy,” said Rousselot, head of strategic design. . to Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

Circular design is about regeneration

This means thinking beyond end-of-life solutions, such as turning plastic bottles into T-shirts, and moving instead towards the active regeneration of ecosystems and local communities.

“Circularity is about designing for systems change, for a future where instead of being a source of global challenges like climate change or biodiversity loss, industry can become a solution to those problems,” explained Rousselot.

“Fashion is a huge lever in the global economy because it touches all of us, and it also has ties to how we manage land and agriculture because of the crops we use to produce fiber. “, she added.

“All of the contributors we have in the book go beyond designing aesthetically appealing and sustainable products with sustainably sourced materials, and integrating aspects of community, place, and design for a better system.”

In his research, Rousselot has found that this shift from an exploitative to a reciprocal relationship with nature often goes hand in hand with the rediscovery of indigenous knowledge and expertise.

“There is a real movement back to what is already known,” she says. “Circular design is a new thing in western countries. But when you talk to some designers in China or Africa, they’ll tell you that’s how they do things.”

Below, Rousselot highlights six contributors to the book who are leading the charge towards a circular fashion industry.


Model holding tote bag with flowers from Orange Culture's SS22 lookbook, photographed by Jolaoso Wasiu Adebayo
The photo is by Jolaoso Wasiu Adebayo

Orange Culture by Adebayo Oke-Lawal

Adebayo Oke-Lawal designs flowing garments that are produced using a 90% local supply chain in Nigeria that covers everything from material sourcing to dyeing and printing.

Thanks to his label based in Lagos orange crop, the designer ensures that the money stays in the community while educating its suppliers and staff on sustainable production methods so they can apply the learnings to other projects.

“Orange Culture uses offcuts from its manufacturing process to form new products or elements such as the lining,” Rousselot said.

“They’ve also started asking their customers to return unwanted clothes, so they can be turned into new clothes and resold. It’s more than a repair service. It’s almost like giving another clothing story.”


Model wearing beige puffer jacket by Christopher Raeburn

Raeburn by Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn began working with surplus fabrics and garments while studying fashion design in London in the early 2000s, buying unworn 1950s military jackets for £1 each and turning them into new ones clothes.

Since then, he has worked to step up the use of salvaged materials for mass production through his own British Fashion Award-winning label. Raeburn, as well as the transition Timberland to regeneratively grown leather in his role as creative director of the shoe brand.

“He was one of the first to bring this practice to a commercial scale, in a way that was appealing and different from what you would expect from an ‘eco brand,’” Rousselot said.

“The community he creates around circular design is the best thing about his job. He now has a space in east London where his team run workshops so people can learn new techniques and sew together. “


Woman holding a chicken while wearing a fluffy white cardigan from the Chinese brand Icicle

Icicle by Ye Shouzeng and Tao Xiaoma

Founded by husband-wife duo Ye Shouzeng and Tao Xiaoma in 1997, the Chinese brand Stalactite draws on five core materials – cashmere, linen, wool, silk and cotton – which are responsibly sourced and minimally processed to keep the focus on the natural beauty of the fibers.

All of the brand’s design and manufacturing is done in-house in its own factories, to ensure traceability while safeguarding the well-being of garment workers.

“They bring this different perspective to circular design, which is based on traditional Chinese philosophy and goes against the Western idea that we are born, we die and then that’s it,” Rousselot said.

“In many Eastern countries, life is already seen as a circular system of reincarnation. So the philosophy of the Tao is to live in moderation and in balance with nature. It’s a very regenerative way of looking at life. and Icicle really brings that philosophy to every detail of what they do.”


Pile of discarded household linen to be turned into clothes Marine Serre

Navy Tight

Beyond her crescent moon print, the French designer Navy Tight is known for making 50% of all its collections from reclaimed textiles such as linens (above), rugs and towels.

Awarded the prestigious LVMH Prize in 2017 and stocked by major retailers such as Selfridges and Browns, Serre’s work shows that trash can have a place in the luxury fashion space – despite its dirty reputation.

“She is extremely avant-garde in the way she designs with these textiles,” Rousselot said. “In fashion design, students are typically taught to define a color palette that will guide their collection, and then find the fabrics to match.”

“But of course when you start designing for the material, that guides the color palette and everything else in your collection, so that’s a totally different place to start.”


Man wearing yellow crochet hat, white shit and black jacket from the Fibershed and Phoebe English collaboration for COP26
The photo is by Asia Werbel

fiber shed

fiber shed is a non-profit organization that helps brands access hyper-local textile supply chains, using regenerative farming practices that sequester carbon in the soil rather than simply emitting it.

In collaboration with its regional office in the south-east of England, the designer phoebe english recently created a range of clothing showcased at the COP26 climate conference (above), for which all textiles were grown, dyed, spun and processed within a 250 kilometer radius of his London studio.

“This approach means you’re not growing acres of cotton, you’re growing different types of crops that naturally thrive in the area, like nettle or hemp,” Rousselot said.

“These crops are grown in a way that is balanced with the environment and actually helps rebuild soil health, sequester carbon and combat biodiversity loss.”


Close up of the weaving process of Dakala fabric by Nkwo Onwuka using blue and orange yarn

Nkwo by Nkwo Onwuka

British-Nigerian designer Nkwo Onwuka developed a new African textile called Dakala, which resembles a handwoven fabric but is made by stripping and sewing together discarded pieces of denim.

With the aim of “turning waste into wealth”, she is now training local women in Abuja to use their skills in traditional textile craftsmanship to create new clothes from the mountains of clothing waste that has been shipped to Nigeria from Western countries.

“She also started looking to source cotton locally,” Rousselot explained. “Nigeria does not grow much cotton, but unlike Kyrgyzstan where it is a cause of desertification, in Nigeria it can grow under rainfed conditions and therefore does not require additional irrigation.”

“She creates this system where the profit is distributed locally so that the living and working conditions of local communities can improve through her activity.”

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Evelyn Choi, actress, model and influencer https://designsbyjanie.com/evelyn-choi-actress-model-and-influencer/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 09:09:57 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/evelyn-choi-actress-model-and-influencer/ Evelyn Choi – actress, model and influencer – shares fashion and beauty tips. Evelyn Choi’s familiar face appears in many ad campaigns, magazine pages and social media posts. After making himself known 14 years ago in the film Echoes of the Rainbowalongside Simon Yam and Sandra Ng, she has appeared in numerous television shows and […]]]>

Evelyn Choi – actress, model and influencer – shares fashion and beauty tips.

Evelyn Choi’s familiar face appears in many ad campaigns, magazine pages and social media posts. After making himself known 14 years ago in the film Echoes of the Rainbowalongside Simon Yam and Sandra Ng, she has appeared in numerous television shows and nearly a dozen films.

Her social media posts are peppered with makeup trends and tips, designer label nods, accessories, colorful dresses, jeans and frilly tops. She’s also known for mixing designer clothes with street chic, so we had to ask Evelyn Choi about everything on-trend – and the trendy young star was compelled to give some helpful advice, and his notions of fashion do’s and don’ts.

Evelyn Choi, Actress-Model and Influencer

To Giorgio Armani
How has your fashion journey evolved?

I read a lot of fashion magazines and watch catwalks, but the most important part of my fashion journey has been the experience. My advice to others is simple: know yourself well and then you will know what kind of style suits your personality and shows the best of yourself.

Your Instagram feed is studded with labels for brands such as Gucci, Sacai, Miu Miu, Tods, Loewe and Giorgio Armani. What are your favorites?

I don’t have a favorite brand or designer per se because I think different brands have distinct characteristics that make them unique. I appreciate and appreciate every designer.

Tell us about your accessories journey.

I like to wear the same accessories a lot, but style them differently each time. How to choose a bag? Well, it’s pretty funny: I use my wallet as a stallion. Of course, I also check if the bag goes with my jeans, as well as my little black dress. A lot of people might go for a signature high-end brand look or a classic design. Somehow, I always end up loving new designs that embody the spirit of the brand.

Would you be influenced by a model or celebrity because they support a particular brand?

I usually decide for myself. A particular look or accessory may look good on a particular model, but not on me. That is why they are models. I believe that different people have their own styles and qualities. Pick a style that suits you, not others.

Does knowing that you influence young women make you more aware of what you wear and post on social media?

For sure. This is why I always share my #ootd (Outfit of the Day), not just because I want to share my fashion but, more importantly, because I want to give advice to girls to find their own style.

Who are your favorite Asian style designers and icons?

Three people come to mind: designers Jason Wu and Vera Wang, and model and influencer Kiwi Lee.

What a fashion oops have you had – and what did you learn from it?

I have to say that hip-hop style is really not my cup of tea. I tried wearing super oversized tops and wide low rise jeans and ended up looking very cropped and shapeless. But I wouldn’t call this style an ‘oops I made a mistake’, it just isn’t for me. I just can’t get away with it like the others.

Are there any shows you watch just for fashion?

I have to admit that I really like reality shows that help and encourage new and upcoming designers like Project Runway and Next in Fashion. It’s always good to see how they fight for their dreams – and as a viewer you can learn to see fashion from different angles as well. From the construction of the fabric to the window dressing, the journey of an outfit, from the designer’s first sketch to the final product is fascinating.

Evelyn Choi, actress, model and influencer
Wearing Chanel
If you had to go to the MET Ball, which would you wear?

Wow – I really don’t know what I would wear. Guess I need to see what the theme was first – it really starts from there, because the theme sets the tone. What I would wear for Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination would be very different from China: Through the Looking Glass.

How well do you work with stylists?

To be honest, I don’t usually work with stylists, as I like to choose my outfits myself – although sometimes I work with a stylist on commercials or magazine shoots. I respect all the stylists in Hong Kong – I think they are very professional.

What do you always have in your makeup bag?

Lip balm.

Beauty trends have moved away from glamor to skincare and wellness. What are your skin care tips?

My advice to readers is simple: less is always more. Don’t try to put a lot of products and products on your face if you are worried about your skin. I always remember that my body needs water. Good skin comes from the inside, not the outside, so for glowing and smooth skin, drink water.

Wearing Gucci
What’s your fashion advice for young girls – or boys?

You don’t have to follow a trend. Maybe you can create your own instead.

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Sunny Leone is beachwear goals in Maldives in 6k monokini, see viral pics https://designsbyjanie.com/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-in-maldives-in-6k-monokini-see-viral-pics/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 09:47:39 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-in-maldives-in-6k-monokini-see-viral-pics/ Homepage / Pictures / Way of life / Sunny Leone is beachwear goals in the Maldives in ??6k monokini, see viral images Sunny Leone is bursting with punch in a pink and blue monokini, worth ??6,720, with a shrug as she enjoys a tropical getaway in the Maldives and our beachwear goals for 2022 are […]]]>

Sunny Leone is bursting with punch in a pink and blue monokini, worth ??6,720, with a shrug as she enjoys a tropical getaway in the Maldives and our beachwear goals for 2022 are set | Check the viral images inside

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST 6 photos

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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Raising the bar for swimwear fashion goals, just at the start of New Years 2022, Bollywood actor Sunny Leone turned on the heat in a pink and blue monokini and fans couldn’t keep their cool. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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Taking her grip from social media, Sunny shared a series of photos from her vacation in the Maldives where she can be seen donning a single strap monokini that was fringed along the dark pink neckline to add to the oomph factor and layered down. on a blue printed background.  (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Taking her grip from social media, Sunny shared a series of photos from her vacation in the Maldives where she can be seen donning a single strap monokini that was fringed along the dark pink neckline to add to the oomph factor and layered down. on a blue printed background. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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Le monokini rose et bleu est attribué à la marque de maillots de bain ultra-chic de la créatrice Aakriti Grover, Flirtatious, qui se vante de styles lumineux, d'ambiance aérée, de tendances élégantes et contemporaines non seulement pour les vêtements de plage mais aussi pour les vêtements de sport.  Le monokini coûte à l'origine <span class=

The pink and blue monokini is attributed to designer Aakriti Grover’s ultra-chic swimwear brand, Flirtatious, which boasts bright styles, an airy vibe, sleek and contemporary trends not only for beach wear but also for sportswear. The monokini originally costs ??6,720 on the creator’s site. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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The monokini was layered with a matching blue print shrug that came with full sleeves.  Sunny left her mid-length braids open behind her back in a side-parted hairstyle as she posed in an exotic setting.  (Instagram / sunnyleone)

The monokini was layered with a matching blue print shrug that came with full sleeves. Sunny left her mid-length braids open behind her back in a side-parted hairstyle as she posed in an exotic setting. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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Accessorizing her look with a pair of redwood hoops, a ring, and a fitness watch, Sunny amplified the glam quotient with a touch of pink lipstick, rosy, highlighted cheeks, kohl-rimmed eyes with streaks of color. black eyeliner, loaded with mascara, filled lashes and eyebrows.  (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Accessorizing her look with a pair of redwood hoops, a ring, and a fitness watch, Sunny amplified the glam quotient with a touch of pink lipstick, rosy, highlighted cheeks, kohl-rimmed eyes with streaks of color. black eyeliner, loaded with mascara, filled lashes and eyebrows. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

₹ 6k monokini, see viral images “data-url =” https://www.hindustantimes.com/photos/lifestyle/sunny-leone-is-beachwear-goals-at-maldives-in-rs-6k-monokini- see -viral-pictures-101641806581083.html “>

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Sunny Leone was styled by fashion designers and stylists Hitendra Kapopara and Sameer Kataria.  (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Sunny Leone was styled by fashion designers and stylists Hitendra Kapopara and Sameer Kataria. (Instagram / sunnyleone)

Updated Jan. 10, 2022, 3:19 p.m. IST

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Designer Rebecca Minkoff reveals the ecological impact of the product with resonance https://designsbyjanie.com/designer-rebecca-minkoff-reveals-the-ecological-impact-of-the-product-with-resonance/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:13:16 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/designer-rebecca-minkoff-reveals-the-ecological-impact-of-the-product-with-resonance/ The sustainability tool and supply chain monitoring platform, called One.Code, will allow buyers to get information about the Rebecca Minkoff products they are purchasing, including details regarding emissions. of carbon, the use of fabric and water, which made the garment and the energy and resources saved through the use of Resonance’s sustainable production model. Resonance […]]]>

The sustainability tool and supply chain monitoring platform, called One.Code, will allow buyers to get information about the Rebecca Minkoff products they are purchasing, including details regarding emissions. of carbon, the use of fabric and water, which made the garment and the energy and resources saved through the use of Resonance’s sustainable production model. Resonance operates out of Chelsea Piers in New York City and offers cloud-based on-demand production alternatives to help designers reduce inventory and waste, producing clothing and products as they go. are purchased by buyers, eliminating wasted inventory. The fashion industry, especially textiles, produces many environmentally harmful by-products, and its legacy production patterns are responsible for nearly one and a half percent of global oil production. Resonance’s on-demand platform offers an interesting alternative to the problem of fashion companies holding and then destroying unsold inventory.

Until supply chain activities are made transparent and the public has a better understanding of the processes involved in the fashion industry, brands will continue to contribute to the problem of environmental degradation. The One.Code transparency tool leverages the immutable ledger of blockchain technology to trace garments throughout their journey through the supply chain to ensure they are made with environmentally friendly materials. environment and ethical work practices. The fashion industry typically relies on a global supply chain of middlemen and factories and suppliers overseas, who in turn all work with their own network of suppliers, sourcers and suppliers. intermediaries. Due to the complexity, brands themselves often have no idea what’s going on with customers even more in the dark. Little Minkoff, Rebecca Minkoff’s children’s line, will use the One.Code transparency tool, just like the RM Green Collection (e). Each piece in the collection will also be made with 95% biodegradable fabric, environmentally friendly chemicals and produced using techniques that dramatically reduce the number of toxic chemicals used. Transparency is an important first step in making the fashion industry more sustainable, and partnerships like the one between Resonance and Rebecca Minkoff offer an exciting glimpse into future opportunities for the industry.

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This article was originally published in the PSFK report, Product-Led Innovation Driving Sustainability in Retail.


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How New York designer Caroline Constas elevates the classic sandal – footwear news https://designsbyjanie.com/how-new-york-designer-caroline-constas-elevates-the-classic-sandal-footwear-news/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 22:38:17 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/how-new-york-designer-caroline-constas-elevates-the-classic-sandal-footwear-news/ After establishing herself as a must-have New York designer of whimsical travel-inspired clothing and swimwear, Caroline Constas tackles a new challenge: shoes. “People have come to know the brand as fun, ironic and classic. The next thing that made sense to complete the look was the shoes, ”said Constas, who grew up in Montreal and […]]]>

After establishing herself as a must-have New York designer of whimsical travel-inspired clothing and swimwear, Caroline Constas tackles a new challenge: shoes.

“People have come to know the brand as fun, ironic and classic. The next thing that made sense to complete the look was the shoes, ”said Constas, who grew up in Montreal and draws much of his inspiration from trips to Greece and the United States.

The designer launched the collection of pumps and sandals made in Brazil with Shopbop, which has sold in many styles.

“I did a lot of research on which factories to work with and really wanted the shoes to be thought through. Starting a new category is basically starting a whole new business, ”she said. In terms of build and fit, it’s a whole different game.


Caroline Constas used an oversized bow to add drama to her polka dot sandals.

CREDIT: courtesy

The goal was to bring the collection’s DNA and details – sequins, gingham, polka dots and prints – to fun, feminine low-heeled shoes that could be worn day or night – from town to beach. . Prices range from $ 340 to $ 560.

“The ready-to-wear collection revolves heavily around prints, so we wanted to find a way to translate that into shoes that are wearable but still make a statement. Prints and shoes can be tricky, but it really works for us, ”said the designer, who modeled her rainbow sequin pumps with an oversized bow from the vacation collection.


Caroline Constas Spring '22

“I really wanted to play with the classic Greek sandal,” the designer said of her Spring / Summer 22 model.

CREDIT: Courtesy Image

During the development of the collection – which happened during the pandemic – Constas relied on Zoom and its factories to help it realize its vision. “We are able to communicate very effectively,” she said. “When I [launched the brand in 2014], it was so important to go and spend three days there. It’s crazy how the world has changed around this time.

The pandemic, she said, also gave her the opportunity to reset.

And now, as she plans her next moves for 2022, the designer anticipates significant growth based on retail performance so far.


Caroline constas sandals

Sandals Caroilne Constas Spring ’22

CREDIT: Courtesy Image


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Most Influential Fashion Designers of 2021 – Massachusetts Daily Collegian https://designsbyjanie.com/most-influential-fashion-designers-of-2021-massachusetts-daily-collegian/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:34:26 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/most-influential-fashion-designers-of-2021-massachusetts-daily-collegian/ From trend designers to timeless figures of fashion Virgil Abloh of Myles Kalus Anak Jihem This year has been an important year for fashion, as social issues have come to the fore. The pandemic has changed the way we think about everything, and the fashion industry is no exception. Many rallies for various causes, such […]]]>

From trend designers to timeless figures of fashion

Virgil Abloh of Myles Kalus Anak Jihem

This year has been an important year for fashion, as social issues have come to the fore. The pandemic has changed the way we think about everything, and the fashion industry is no exception. Many rallies for various causes, such as climate change and sustainability, have shaped the way consumers buy and invest. Saving or buying from more ethical brands gained popularity as consumers tried to avoid fast fashion industries that have a significant impact on our carbon footprint. Many fashion designers have spoken out about the political and social issues that have influenced their designs. Others expressed their gender identity, created new definitions of fabric quality and let their creativity guide them.

Virgil Abloh

Abloh, Louis Vuitton’s first black designer, eventually became the company’s head of men’s clothing. He was also the Founder and Creative Director of Off-White and Creative Director of Kanye West’s Yeezy. Abloh was a brilliant gamechanger in the fashion industry. He passed away last november at age 41 from cancer. Abloh first learned the basics of clothing from her mother who worked as a seamstress. By designing Kanye West’s Donda (A company of content, experience and products) he was inspired to launch “Off-White”. The company is known for its minimalist approach to streetwear and unique designs. In his obituary, Abloh describes his approach to fashion as “the idea that you can take an existing design and tweak it a little bit, and it will be called a new one.”

Stella mccartney

McCartney, known for her vegan approach to fashion design, does not incorporate any leather or fur in his drawings. Founder and Creative Director of McCartney, Stella McCartney began as an intern at Christian Lacroix and was Creative Director of Chloé. She championed environmental concerns and sustainable businesses. Its spring 2022 collection presented creations dedicated to nature. 63% of the materials used in the 2022 collection were considered environmentally friendly. The McCartney brand is versatile when it comes to style, its bags have been worn by Meghan Markle and Anne Hathaway. McCartney also collaborated with sports brand Adidas to create sneakers and sportswear.

Simone rocha

The Irish designer, known for her feminine fashion reach, clean color palette and short dresses with puffed sleeves. Rocha’s fabric choices, including lace, have been seen on celebrities like Natalie Portman and Saoirse Ronan. Daughter of designer John Rocha, Simone Rocha’s take on fashion is much lighter and more minimalist. His collaboration with H&M touched everyday people, including men’s and children’s wear. In an interview with Vogue, Rocha explained, “When H&M came to speak, I said, if I want to do it, I want to do it for everyone, not just for women, but for men and kids, and for me. ensure they get quality. “

Lirika Matoshi

Remember that “Strawberry dress” that exploded on Pinterest and Tiktok? The shimmering tulle creation was designed by New York designer Lirika Matoshi. Matoshi’s youthful creations have been seen on celebrities such as Elle King and Tess Holiday. Matoshi never attended a design school before creating his brand. Regardless, the designer from Kosovo is now in competition with other major brands of women’s ready-to-wear. Its sizes go up to 18. Matoski mentioned to Vogue, Most of my designs are inspired by my childhood. Patterns like strawberries and materials like tulle all resembling princess dresses create a nostalgia factor that Matoski describes as “undeniable.”

Daniel roseberry

Although he started working with Thom Browne for ten years, Roseberry is now known to be the artistic director of the Parisian fashion house Schiaparelli Haute Couture, by Elsa Schiaparelli. Roseberry has been part of Schiaparelli Haute Couture since 2019, the brand was relaunched in 2014. Roseberry has designed many Schiaparelli pieces worthy of discussion this year. Lady Gaga stunned a custom navy and red dress at Biden’s 2021 inauguration. The bulletproof dress, with the golden dove brooch, is in Gaga’s own words, “one of my favorite things I have ever worn.” Bella Hadid stunned a black dress at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival with a golden brass necklace, adorning the lungs trompe l’oeil.

Amy Aguayo can be reached at [email protected]



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Heart Of The City Festival Highlights Emerging Indigenous Art and Fashion in Edmonton https://designsbyjanie.com/heart-of-the-city-festival-highlights-emerging-indigenous-art-and-fashion-in-edmonton/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:57:54 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/heart-of-the-city-festival-highlights-emerging-indigenous-art-and-fashion-in-edmonton/ (ANNews) – On December 12, Heart of The City showcased emerging Indigenous talent in the city of Edmonton. The event was well attended by the newly elected Mayor of Edmonton, Amarjeet Sohi, and his wife, Sarbjeet Sohi. Jodi Calahoo Stonehouse was the master of ceremonies for the evening, which included a deer beef stew for […]]]>

(ANNews) – On December 12, Heart of The City showcased emerging Indigenous talent in the city of Edmonton. The event was well attended by the newly elected Mayor of Edmonton, Amarjeet Sohi, and his wife, Sarbjeet Sohi. Jodi Calahoo Stonehouse was the master of ceremonies for the evening, which included a deer beef stew for the guests of Nék̓em’s Vee Point!

“I am proud to support Edmonton’s Indigenous community,” said Mayor Sohi. “In the New Year, I hope to do more for the Indigenous people living in the city. He also said he aimed to invest more in Indigenous art and culture and highlighted the vital role Indigenous peoples play in Edmonton.

Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton is a non-profit organization whose mission is “Inspiration and Opportunity Through the Arts”. Their vision is to be “one of our city’s premier free music and art festivals, dedicated to promoting and supporting local, original and emerging artists in the heart of Edmonton.”

Community partners included Mike Siek and Fay Fey Dunaway of the Heart of the City Board of Directors, Epcor’s Heart and Soul Fund, Edmonton Arts Council, McCauley Community League and the venue was provided by the Parkdale Cromdale Community League.

The event was organized by Corinne Demas, who is part of the Heart Of The City Music Festival. She said her group seeks to showcase Indigenous fashion and art in Edmonton. The group has partnered with Edmonton’s emerging Aboriginal talent, art and fashion community to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere for the urban community.

Demas said the event was the Heart of the City Festival’s first Indigenous fashion show, clothing drive and community dinner.

She was able to spotlight three emerging fashion designers – Heather Bouchier, Rhonda Johnson and Erin Meetoos.

Heather Bouchier said she had a great relationship with Corinne Demas. “We discussed the event around a campfire and she wanted to do something with native art. The Heart of the City Music festival usually takes place in the summer but due to covid -19 they had to change things up, ”she explained.

During the show, Bouchier showcased her cycling line that incorporates fabric from Indigenous fabric designer Stephanie Gustafson. She described her cycling line as having been inspired by ’90s grunge and the use of sheer fabrics.

“I take inspiration from my Cree culture, but I also use Western techniques,” says Bouchier.

In speeches at the event, Bouchier explained that she grew up poor and low-income. “I grew up being told not to waste anything. Growing up I did a lot of thrift stores and still do today – it’s part of the inspiration behind cycling.

Rhonda Johnson, owner of Acahkos Designs, originally from Treaty 8 and the community of Cold Lake, said she has designed most of her life.

“My style is aboriginal glam,” Johnson said. “I have conceived most of my life. I graduated from fashion and design school in 2016. ”

She explained, “I’m a mom and raising a family while pursuing a career in fashion. After taking time out during COVID-19, I am reappearing in the fashion community with a new line. ”

She describes her line as infusing traditional and contemporary Indigenous designs. “I use a lot of ribbons with a modern native aesthetic.”

Johnson said that “we learn a lot from our culture orally and from our elders, but we also have to learn professionalism – for example our elders cannot teach us how to write a model.”

Erin Meetoos was the third designer to showcase her work and in an online video provided by Heart of the City she said: was excited and very nervous.

Meetoos explained that his badge designs are wearable and for Indigenous women; nothing too high end but pieces that you can wear to galas or events.

The event also included Aboriginal beauty businesses such as “Beauty by Jacqueline” owned by Jacqueline Buffalo.

“I applied eyelashes, touched up eyebrows, and made up for the models,” Buffalo said. “I agreed to come and help them because I’m friends with the creators and my business is quite new, so I’m ready to go out and help promote the business.”

It’s such an amazing experience to be a part of the indigenous fashion community, added Buffalo. “I absolutely love the people I have met over the years. Without them, it would be difficult to continue doing what I love, which is to be creative.

Darrell Brertton, a prominent powwow dancer and Indigenous entrepreneur who posed for the show said, “It was such good medicine! I loved the energy from the models to the designers and even our special guest, the Mayor of the City of Edmonton! It is an honor to model these amazing pieces as there is no doubt in my mind that these designers will be well known across Turtle Island.


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Sunil Sethi’s point of view on fashion in 2022 https://designsbyjanie.com/sunil-sethis-point-of-view-on-fashion-in-2022/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 05:01:22 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/sunil-sethis-point-of-view-on-fashion-in-2022/ By Tanya Banon New Delhi, January 1 (IANSlife): 2021 has been a busy year for the fashion industry, from Fashion Week collaborations to a focus on sustainability to corporate investments in designers like Manish Malhotra, Sabyasachi, Tarun Tahiliani and Anamika Khanna. What does this year have in store for the fabulous world of fashion? IANSlife […]]]>

By Tanya Banon

New Delhi, January 1 (IANSlife): 2021 has been a busy year for the fashion industry, from Fashion Week collaborations to a focus on sustainability to corporate investments in designers like Manish Malhotra, Sabyasachi, Tarun Tahiliani and Anamika Khanna. What does this year have in store for the fabulous world of fashion? IANSlife speaks with Sunil Sethi, President of the FDCI, to learn about his outlook for 2022:

Read excerpts:

Q: From literature festivals to art fairs, events have returned to the physical format in all industries, can we expect that in fashion too?

Sethi: As things got better and started to get back to normal, everything that we had planned from January 1, 2022 was planned in the physical format. We have a handmade fashion show taking place in Dubai this month as part of the Dubai Expo, all arrangements have been made for that already. In February, we are planning a four city fashion tour with shows in Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad and Kolkata with a longtime supporter of Indian fashion. In March, the FDCI X LFW collaboration continues, this time with a Fashion Week in Delhi. We will also be holding a nationwide mela handmade fashion show, which takes place every year. We are really looking forward to these shows.

So the first three months is the busiest time of the year for fashion, the arrangements are so intensive and at the final stage, that we can’t afford to do it virtual. Of course depending on the reality on the ground and respecting the country’s law regarding Omicron government protocols, if necessary, we can juggle the dates.

Q: You mentioned that the FDCI X LFW collaboration continues with a fashion week, this time in Delhi, can we finally see a unified fashion front?

Sethi: The beginnings have already been made, during the pandemic we have already successfully wrapped up two joint fashion weeks, and by moving this effort and collaboration forward, we are coming back to the physical format together.

Q: 2021 has seen many companies invest in designers for large stakes in the business, what does the fashion body think about it and what does that mean?

Sethi: FDCI has always been created with the aim of focusing on the fashion industry, and that has been our focus for over two decades. With this development we have been vindicated and we can see our hard work paying off. Everything is going, and hats off to the companies that believe in and support Indian fashion designers to the hilt. We are reaping the rewards of the hard work of FDCI and the designers. Although the spotlight is on Manish Malhotra, Sabyasachi, Tarun Tahiliani, Ritu Kumar and Anamika Khanna, over the years companies have invested in brands like Anita Dongre or Raghavendra Rathore. So we are very happy that many companies have invested in many creators and young labels in 2021, these are all new relationships and it will take time to develop. I hope that in 2022, such investments will multiply.

Q: Does this also herald new FDCI news and new leadership?

Sethi: Drawing on my experience over the years, whether it’s fashion weeks, handweaving and government collaborations, or even joint fashion events and fashion tours from company, my conclusion tells us that it is a combined and collective effort; and FDCI has the continued responsibility to focus on creating and propelling such efforts, and combining the strengths of various sectors and players to continue to strengthen the industry and give it the direction and stimulation it needs. So for lack of a better word, the FDCI as the top fashion ‘body’ will also play the role of an industry body, say like a FICCI or ASSOCHAM, to take care of a lot. more things and deepen the need of the moment. . The Board of Directors and FDCI remain loyal to the business of fashion with the objective of sustainability and longevity of the industry.


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How men’s fashion has changed for the better this year https://designsbyjanie.com/how-mens-fashion-has-changed-for-the-better-this-year/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:01:55 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/how-mens-fashion-has-changed-for-the-better-this-year/ It’s a disappointment I’ve faced far too many times: you walk into a department store, walk past fabulous and fun womenswear, only to find that the men’s section is in a dingy basement and filled with sad and dull rooms. Unfortunately, the men’s market has always been a snoozefest. While Hollywood men have stuck with […]]]>

It’s a disappointment I’ve faced far too many times: you walk into a department store, walk past fabulous and fun womenswear, only to find that the men’s section is in a dingy basement and filled with sad and dull rooms. Unfortunately, the men’s market has always been a snoozefest. While Hollywood men have stuck with their classic tuxedos and suits on the red carpet, retailers have also hung on to what sells (which is said to be classic suits, or simple pieces in calm, neutral colors). ). I often had to shop in the women’s section to find something adventurous and daring.

With the exception of the catwalks, where high fashion brands like Versace and Gucci have long offered innovative menswear designs, it has been really boring to take the male market as an obsessive fashion fan. Like the catwalks, I want my shops and my stars to inspire me with a fantasy! Fortunately, in 2021 we have seen more change than ever on the male scene. Finally, options for the more avant-garde man presented themselves in new and original ways, and it was about time.

Below are five ways menswear has improved this year.

Hollywood stars took risks …

Male Hollywood stars weren’t afraid to experiment with red carpet fashion this year. There were a lot of classic costumes and tuxedos in the mix, of course, but we also saw actors, singers, and models think outside the box. Highlights for 2021 include Harry Styles’ pink feather boa at the Grammys, Troye Sivan’s black Altu dress at the Met Gala, and the bondage-style strappy top that Lil Nas X wore at the Variety Hitmaker lunch earlier this month. Where Hollywood gentlemen once played it safe, it’s refreshing to see stars go for bold statements and reject the invisible lines around gendered style. This portrayal also has a ripple effect – think of the influence they also have on designers and fans, who are perhaps now much more willing to take risks, too.

… And normal men too!

However, it wasn’t just famous men who dared to experiment with their looks. On the street style scene, “ordinary” men and non-binary people have defied gender norms by slipping into heels, skirts and handbags with ease. (And for once, they can fit in: brands like Syro specialize in taller heels for men.)

Even retailers are noticing a change in the way men shop. “More and more, men are starting to see dressing less of a burden and more of an inherently social act,” says Jian DeLeon, menswear and editorial director at Nordstrom. “The more guys relax their attitude about what they can wear and are really willing to experiment, the more they can see how much fun you can have with your clothes. This is what I look forward to.


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Bebe Rexha shares her insecurities about her weight on TikTok https://designsbyjanie.com/bebe-rexha-shares-her-insecurities-about-her-weight-on-tiktok/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:02:22 +0000 https://designsbyjanie.com/bebe-rexha-shares-her-insecurities-about-her-weight-on-tiktok/ Bebe Rexha doesn’t feel better about herself. The interpreter of “Me Myself & I” became frank on TikTok this week, telling her more than 7.1 million followers that she took a step back from social media posts because of feeling uncomfortable with her body. “I think I am the heaviest I have ever been,” said […]]]>

Bebe Rexha doesn’t feel better about herself.

The interpreter of “Me Myself & I” became frank on TikTok this week, telling her more than 7.1 million followers that she took a step back from social media posts because of feeling uncomfortable with her body.

“I think I am the heaviest I have ever been,” said Rexha, who was on the verge of tears, said in the video. “I am weighing myself earlier and I don’t feel comfortable sharing the weight because I feel embarrassed.”

The 32-year-old added that she felt “disgusting” in her own body.

“I don’t feel good about myself and when I don’t feel good I don’t want to post,” she continued. “And that’s really the reason I haven’t posted in the last year. As much as I used to.”

Singer Bebe Rexha says she feels “embarrassed” by her weight in a new TikTok. (Photo by Axelle / Bauer-Griffin / FilmMagic)

Rexha has been a strong advocate for body acceptance. In 2019, she called out fashion designers who reportedly not dress her up for the Grammys because she was “too fat”. She said Cosmopolitan from experience, “You say all the women in the world who are size 8 and up are not beautiful and they can’t wear your dresses … f ** k you, I don’t wanna wear your f fucking dresses.

Earlier this year, she encouraged her followers to adopt all shapes and sizes in post a positive body on TikTok of herself dancing in lingerie.

“How much do you think I weigh? It’s nobody’s business, “she wrote in her video.” Because I’m a bad bitch no matter how heavy I am. But let’s normalize 165 pounds. “

The artist “Break My Heart” also created a collection with the lingerie brand Adore Me, specially designed to include all body types. She said People, “I’m all about body positivity, inclusivity, and I was really excited to partner with a brand that really believes in it and has been pushing it for quite some time. As a woman who wasn’t the cookie-cutter pop star, I hope to inspire women to love their bodies and feel beautiful regardless of their size. “

While the two-time Grammy nominee may have felt insecure about her most recent TikTok, a new Instagram post on her story suggests she’s putting herself forward. She shared the quote, “My New Years resolution is to stop wondering if I’m good enough for other people and start wondering if they’re good enough for me.”


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