Massachusetts Company Behind Cutting-Edge Garments for the Jobsite

Ted De Innocentis, co-founder of 1620 Workwear in Amesbury, Massachusetts, knows a thing or two about the textile and apparel business. Before De Innocentis and her pal, co-founder Josh Walker, founded 1620 Workwear, De Innocentis spent five years manufacturing high-end apparel and sportswear in China. “It all starts with the fabric,” said De Innocentis. “The best fabric makes the best workwear.” When the two launched their own product six years ago, De Innocentis knew they wanted to create cutting-edge garments for the construction site, and that they had to be made from the best materials available. An example is a fabric used in the shoulder pads of an NFL on-field jersey. “So it’s designed to withstand abrasion and impact and be washed multiple times,” De Innocentis said. Walker and De Innocentis said it wasn’t your dad’s work clothes. “Our goal at 1620 is to create a new brand that young people entering the trades can relate to,” Walker said. Defending the job market is just one of the goals of 1620. “We’ve always wanted to make as many things as possible in Massachusetts,” Walker said. “Some of the products in our line are 100% made in Massachusetts. The fabric is machined here. The garments are sewn and assembled here and we’re very proud of that because there’s an incredible heritage of garment manufacturing in Massachusetts.” quality fabrics come at a price, but according to De Innocentis and Walker, they are growing steadily with a 60% retention rate. They see this as the framework for building a successful business in the future. “We’re still a very small company that isn’t known in many places,” Walker said. “I’m sure a lot of people who see this show have never heard of us, but it’s exciting to continue on the path of growth and to work hard at it.” 1620 Workwear is a direct-to-consumer business, which means people won’t find them in a clothing store. That said, they have a showroom in Amesbury where people can try on items for size. They just ask that people call first to arrange a visit time.

Ted De Innocentis, co-founder of 1620 Workwear in Amesbury, Massachusetts, knows a thing or two about the textile and apparel business.

Before De Innocentis and her pal, co-founder Josh Walker, founded 1620 Workwear, De Innocentis spent five years in China manufacturing high-end apparel and activewear.

“It all starts with the fabric,” said De Innocentis. “The best fabric makes the best workwear.”

When the two launched their own product six years ago, De Innocentis knew they wanted to create cutting-edge garments for the construction site, and that they had to be made from the best materials available.

An example is a fabric used in the shoulder pads of an NFL on-field jersey.

“So it’s designed to be abrasion and impact resistant and to be washed multiple times,” De Innocentis said.

Walker and De Innocentis said it wasn’t your dad’s work clothes.

“Our goal at 1620 is to create a new brand that young people entering the trades can relate to,” Walker said.

Defending the labor market is only one of the objectives of 1620.

“We always wanted to do as many things as possible in Massachusetts,” Walker said. “Some of the products in our line are 100% made in Massachusetts. The fabric is machined here. The garments are sewn and assembled here and we’re very proud of that because there’s an incredible heritage of garment manufacturing in Massachusetts.”

Using the best fabrics comes at a price, but according to De Innocentis and Walker, they are growing steadily with a 60% retention rate. They see this as the framework for building a successful business in the future.

“We’re still a very small company that isn’t known in many places,” Walker said. “I’m sure a lot of people who see this show have never heard of us, but it’s exciting to keep growing and working hard at it.”

1620 Workwear is a direct-to-consumer company, which means people won’t find them in a clothing store. That said, they have a showroom in Amesbury where people can try on items for size. They just ask that people call first to arrange a visit time.

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