Sustainable designers determined to show their work despite Fashion Week postponement

Manawatū fashion designer Jodie Woods is determined to promote sustainable designer clothes in a Covid-19 safe show.

Warwick Smith / Stuff

Manawatū fashion designer Jodie Woods is determined to promote sustainable designer clothes in a Covid-19 safe show.

New Zealand Fashion Week has been postponed for a second time due to Covid-19, but that’s not stopping sustainable designers from showcasing their work.

Manawatū creator Jodie Woods said smaller producers relied on shows to get their clothes to stores, but in this case being small was a plus – they could always plan a private, Covid-19-secured event .

“When you’re a small designer, Fashion Week can really raise your profile,” she said.

“It means an opportunity for growth…for more retailers to see what we do, and for other designers to see how easy it can be to make fashion sustainable.”

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The Tonic & Cloth collection at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018.

Provided / Stuff

The Tonic & Cloth collection at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018.

Woods’ debut at New Zealand Fashion Week in 2018 had been a huge platform for her sustainable streetwear label.

In 2019, she moved her studio from a trailer in Feilding to a store on George Street in Palmerston North.

She now has three retailers stocking her clothes, including a range of Covid masks stocked by Cosmic.

The ethical production of its clothes was an integral part of its history. She has partnered with Holi Boli, a New Zealander-run manufacturer in India, which hires local women for fair wages under good working conditions.

Woods said she and other designers, including Duffle & Co, who were scheduled to take part in the Sustainable Fashion Week show, are now holding their own.

“We’ll have to be strategic about the numbers in light of the traffic light system, but that’s the fabulous thing about being ‘a little fish in a big pond’, we can be nimble and focused, and change direction quickly. .”

The show would be set in Auckland and feature a diverse case of models of different heights, ages and ethnicities.

“While the cancellation is sad for everyone who has invested so much in organizing fashion week, our kaupapa remains the same. We still want to see lives changed through fashion.

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