Want to get creative during lockdown? Get sewing ideas from New Zealand designers

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If you’re sitting at home and want to get creative but don’t know where to start, you’re in luck. Some New Zealand designers have created designs that you can get your hands on, so that you can create your own room from the comfort of your own home. There’s also knitting, embroidery, and more, and we’ve put together to help.

Liam patterns

If you want options this lock, Liam patterns offers exactly that.

These models were designed by Liam’s designer and Ruby’s general manager, Emily Miller-Sharma, with options for beginners, intermediates and advanced.

She said the brand launched a first batch during the 2020 lockdown and was really surprised by the demand.

“Then we thought ‘cool, this might be a thing for us’.”

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Following the launch of the first collection, Emily hosted a number of Zoom sewing and pattern making classes and launched the full Liam Patterns collection in August 2020.

The printed designs were made from waste from the production of pine forests, which Miller-Sharma said was important to them.

“We know we need to move to a more circular business model.

“The finished product is made from waste.

Emily Miller-Sharma, Managing Director of Ruby and Creator of Liam, talks about their pattern collection.

LAWRENCE SMITH / Tips

Emily Miller-Sharma, Managing Director of Ruby and Creator of Liam, talks about their pattern collection.

They were also working on making the patterns available in PDF.

While they were selling their intellectual property by selling their models, Miller-Sharma said part of it was working with their clients.

“[They can] put more of yourself into it because the clothes we wear are an extension of ourselves, and if you can put more of yourself into it, that’s really powerful.

Miller-Sharma encouraged those who were just starting out to think about their fabric choice and use more stable fabrics like linen or cotton, and to avoid devious fabrics like silk.

She also encouraged people to get creative and use the items they have around the house to turn them into new rooms, like old bed sheets or vintage curtains.

“There are so many things you can play with. “

She said once their stores south of Auckland went to Alert Level 3, the printed designs could be shipped.

The daring

Created by Freedom Holloway, The daring produces clothing in the most ethical manner currently available.

If you want to get your hands on one of her amazing creations, you have to purchase them through the releases that she does every four to five weeks, as each piece is made to order, and she only takes a set number. orders every time.

But if you’ve been lucky on its latest version, you’ll soon be able to make your own thanks to Holloway’s DIY workshops that come to a sewing machine near you.

Her sought-after wrap-style dresses will be released as sewing patterns during this launch.

The initial workshop package will be a basic “how to sew” course for beginners, with videos and tutorials written to create the styles, and everything you need to know to create your own dress.

Sign up to be notified when their very first model is released on their website here.

Holloway is publishing an internship module which will include a basic course on “how to sew”.

PROVIDED

Holloway is publishing an internship module which will include a basic course on “how to sew”.

Crispy Caitlin

New Zealand designer Caitlin Crisp is a young designer who is making a name for herself for her playful yet wearable pieces. She launched her eponymous brand after appearing on Project track New Zealand in 2018.

She was supposed to showcase her season 5 collection at New Zealand Fashion Week last week, which was postponed due to Covid-19, but is now locked out with the rest of the country.

At home, Crisp reminded her social media followers that she has a model available for purchase for make a crop with puffed sleeves, which includes detailed instructions on how to assemble it.

Only size 12 is currently available, and on her Instagram she has a “make your own” highlight reel, which gives you a visual building tutorial.

Small business

While not all of us are able to sew, there is some sort of craft available for all of us.

At Small business, a Sacha McNeil website celebrating the handmade, the homemade, and those who design, there are plenty of options for people to get creative without a sewing machine.

McNeil, known for her work as a New Zealand journalist and news anchor, created the site a few months ago.

“I kind of started it pretty calmly and then with the lockdown it picked up because people are at home and want a little project to do.”

Sacha McNeil created Of Small Matters a few months ago, an ode to the handmade and the home.

Michael Bradley / Stuff

Sacha McNeil created Of Small Matters a few months ago, an ode to the handmade and the home.

On the website, McNeil has articles that teach you how to recycle your clothes through embroidery, including a tutorial on how to embroider on a denim jacket.

She also has instructions on how to knit fingerless gloves, a single point sampler which shows you some stitches needed to learn embroidery and a pattern on how to knit “Anything from animals”.

McNeil said that for those who are just starting out, she recommended starting with the simple stitch guide first, as it could be done with a needle and thread.

“A lot of people, at the end of the day, like to sit down and do something with their hands. It’s nice enough to do something where you’re not looking at a screen.

“It’s a way to slow down.


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